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Entrant Name
Ko Wibowo, AIA, LEED AP

Design Team
Ko Wibowo AIA, LEED AP/Architecture for Everyone

Collaborators
Wetland Biologist: David Conlin/GeoEngineers Geotechnical Engineer: D. J. Thompson/GeoEngineers Structural Engineer: Panos Trochalakis/YT Engineers Contractor: Harley Wanaka/Wanaka and Sons

Owner / Client
Ken and Claire Stevens

Stevens Addition

All Submissions > Scale 2: Building Scale

The Stevens are an active couple in their 70s.  Ken was a chemistry professor who became a ceramic artist and Claire is a physician assistant involved in medical research. They live in their original house built in early 1970s, designed by Jane Hastings, FAIA, a prominent female architect in WA. The house is a modern northwest style tucked into a sloping wooded site adjacent to a state park.
Just a few years ago Ken was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. The Stevens did not want to leave their home and decided to do an addition to their house to accommodate Ken’s need.
The addition posed two challenges. First is to create an addition that fits the wooded site and respects the existing modern northwest style house. Second is to accommodate not only Ken’s basic physical needs but also his neural and psychological needs.
To minimize its impact on the site, the addition basic formal solution is inspired by a tree trunk (“stump”) with its cut branches. The trunk contains basement and master bedroom (above the basement) as the center of the addition surrounded by cantilevered supporting spaces, and connection to the existing house, as the branches. This concept complements the verticality of the existing house with steep roof slope representing a tree within the wooded site.
A research paper on dementia care points the importance of keeping the design as homelike as possible and to include a lot of familiar settings or objects in the space. A secured outdoor gardening space is also recommended. The addition is designed to not only add an accessible bedroom and bathroom but also to feature display spaces for Ken’s ceramic art pieces, a study area, and an enclosed deck to help him retain his memories and keep him safe while remain active.
The addition promises that aging can take place at home, a place where Ken, and all of us, feel safe, familiar, comfortable, cared for, dignified and in high spirit of living than in hospital like environment of a nursing home.